Archive for the ‘Metrorail Mondays’ Category

Avoiding Temptation

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The trains suffered many delays due to maintenance or the lack thereof.

“I got home at 10 o’clock last night,” a guy mentions to a friend next to him.

“You must thank heaven for making it home in one piece bru,” the friend replies.

“Tell that to my wife, buddy. She suspects I’m playing truant, always suspicious, expecting the worst you know,” he explains to his friend rolling his eyes.

The friend looks at him for a moment without uttering a word. The train elegantly gallops to the next station.

You must have given her reason to be suspicious, always expecting the worst, the friend thinks quietly. Different people get off at different destinations, from different backgrounds. Where is this train called South Africa heading? the thoughts rush through his mind. Are we heading for a train smash or are we going to derail? he asks himself and thinks about it for a few more moments.

The guy with the suspicious wife is meanwhile fiddling with his phone.

I think good people will rise to the occasion. Surely they won’t allow this beautiful country to go to the dogs? his thoughts continue while he glimpses at his friend’s phone.
“Ah… That’s why your wife is suspicious; look at all those female contacts,” he observes glancing at the phone. He clears his throat…
“Buddy, that’s not good for a married guy. You are too close to temptation bru. Before you know it you’ve taken the plunge,” he advises his friend.

Smiling with a blushing face the friend closes the screen of the phone and then with a wry smile he looks up. “Just friends man,” he remarks, attempting to brush any suspicion aside.

“I know; I was there too,” he answers the guy who slips the phone back into his pocket. “I had genuine friends as contacts and really enjoyed the chats, but must admit that on a few occasions I overstepped the mark. My wife didn’t deserve that. The lady friend didn’t deserve it either and ultimately it’s about my ego which got in the way. I got a fright when I started to feel no regret for my actions. That was the turning point. I changed my number but above all I changed my ways,” he confesses openly and earnestly.

The guy with the suspicious wife looks at him without blinking an eye.

“Let me tell you something I would like to share with you my friend,” the friend goes on to say without waiting for a response. “A colleague sent me an SMS one morning which changed my perception for the better and the message said: ‘The person who is with you when you have nothing is the person who needs to be with you when you have everything.’ I didn’t recognise the number so I called back to ask who it was. The voice on the other side said: ‘Just a concerned colleague’”.

The guy with the suspicious wife listens attentively.

The friend continues after pausing for a moment. “We’ve been friends for a long time now Jamie and as far I can see, Marilyn is a good wife and mother to your child. Yes, your so-called friends might be more exciting and entertaining but she’s your soul mate. Remember our conversation when you declared your intention to marry her and wanted my opinion?
I said that is one of the greatest decisions you ever made, remember?”

“Yes I remember,” the guy with the suspicious wife answers without hesitation.

“Do the right thing buddy. This is coming from a concerned friend,” he admonishes his friend again.

The guy with the suspicious wife looks down avoiding the eyes of his friend. He remains like that for a few moments almost looking deep into his heart and soul. Donny is right, he quietly thinks to himself. I did overstep the mark and only felt guilty for a short while. This is getting dangerous.

“We need a driver who can take us to the destination of hope, peace and prosperity for all on this train called South Africa, Donny thinks to himself as we enter Salt River station.

The Magic Potion

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A vendor enters the carriage from the left as the train leaves the station. Immediately he gets the attention of the commuters.

“Fresh from the fountain in the mountain,” he says in a raised voice.

“Tien ran’… tien ran’… Hurry, hurry, is ’n bargain. Daa is nog klom’ waa’ die vanaa’ kom,” he brags as he swags down the aisle.

“Is die regte goed?” a lady asks, almost shouting in surprise.

“Kyk self,” the vendor chirps as he slips the 500 millilitre bottle into her hand.

With an expression between excitement and anxiety she quickly checks the bottle and the seal. “Lyk genuine,” she says to the commuter next to her. He shakes his head in approval.

“Tien ran’; djy moet enjoy baby-girl,” the vendor reminds her as he extends an open hand ignoring the bottle completely. Her purse opens in a flash. A twenty rand note jumps into his hand and without thinking twice he suggests: “Vat die grootman somma een. Return net haa tien ran’ as ie ou nie mind nie, of wat praat ek alles?” he asks with a polite expression and gesture.

The middle-aged guy looks at him with a stern face. Suddenly he smiles and says: “Ok fine; djy het my,” and reaches for his wallet.

“Nog te bietere; koep ’ie ou somma haa bottel of wat sê djy baby-girl?” the vendor suggests turning his eyes towards the middle-aged guy and the lady, who are both smiling politely.

“Djy kry my alwee,” the middle-aged guy says, still smiling.

“Djy kan maa ophou,” Baby-girl adds to the conversation.

“Ek mean ma… Julle sit soe droeg hiesa,” the vendor quips while he balances his produce in one hand and steadies the cooler box between his legs.

“Koellek soelang julle gel. Ek kap ’n paal net hie. Ek het net tien oo,’” he informs the commuters.

A twenty rand appears from the middle-aged guy’s purse.

“It’s fine baby-girl,” he says to the lady next to him.

“You didn’t need to, but thanks anyway,” she responds smiling back at him.

“You’re welcome,” he whispers as the vendor returns her money.

“Baby-girl djy moerit enjoy.”

“Wats jou naam nou wee?” Fonnie quickly asks in the same breath.

She looks at him for a moment, smiles says, “Claire, …en by the way, wat wil djy met my naam maak?” she enquires.

“Aweh, will it virrie laanie langs jou gie baby-girl,” he replies almost without thinking. She blushes and looks down. Her hair falls forward almost covering her face.

“Hi Claire, I’m Giovanni. Cheers on that,” the middle-aged guy introduces himself while he cracks the seal of the bottle. She opens hers shyly and looks up.

“Pleased to meet you; cheers,” she adds with a shy smile.

“Pity Fonnie kannie cheers ’ie. Stocks are limited but tomorrow is another day,” the vendor says with a twinkle in his eyes.

As he bows down to grab the coolerbox Claire quips, “Lekke dag. Djy het nou ôs altwie gekry.”

“Enjoy baby-girl. Julle het somma mekaa gekry, of wat praat ek alles?” the vendor shoots, shrugging his shoulders and winking at her and Giovanni.

“Hoe lyk hulle hie?” he asks as he turns around facing the commuters. “Aweh, julle het somma die gel reg my ma se kinnes,” he says in a happy voice, seeing a guy paying with five ten rands collecting the bottles and dishing them out to the commuters seated next to him.

“Wiet djy hoe lank wag ôs,” the guy protests while opening his bottle.

“Djy het mos ees ’n wedding gehou,” he mumbles moments before the bottle touches his lips.

“Djy wiet hoe garrit, maa net ou Fonnie se personal touch,” the vendor answers shrugging his shoulders again.

The train reduces speed.

Fonnie holds onto the support pillar glancing over to Claire and Giovanni.

“I work in town but due to circumstances, junk status, etc. I decided to give Metrorail a try,” she explains to Giovanni.

“I travel by train and never saw you,” Giovanni says.

“This is my first week but so far so good,” she replies smiling.”

“Maybe I’m the lucky one. You might need a guardian angel; you never know,” Giovanni whispers to her as he takes a sip from the bottle, hiding his smile.

“You never know,” she replies.

Their smiling eyes meet as he lowers the bottle.

“Aweh, Fonnie het mos magic potion sê ek nog altyd.”

Claire’s giggle is just about audible.

A full smile appears on Giovanni’s face. “Daa kry djy my alwee,” he says.

Meanwhile Fonnie makes his way towards the door.

“Moen nettie van Fonnie vegiettie. Nooi vi my oek,” he shouts over his shoulder.

The train is almost at a standstill. Giovanni and Claire’s eyes are now fixed on him. Their eyes are saying, “waavan praat djy?”

“Ôs praat wee. Ek bring môre wee van daai. Allie pad van Ceres af, specially vi julle twie. Soes julle wiet is hie niks waate innie kaap ’ie.”

The train comes to a halt.

“Safe journey guys; hou maa die tien rante reg,” Fonnie greets as he exits the carriage.

***

Urban Dictionary
ran’ – Pronounced “run”, it is the Afrikaaps version of “rand” which is our South African currency.
klom – The Afrikaaps version of “kom” which is an Afrikaans word for “many”.
Vanaa’ – The Afrikaaps version of “vandaan” which in Afrikaans means “from”.
bietere – The Afrikaaps term for “meer beter” which in Afrikaans means “more better / even better”.
koep – The Afrikaaps word for “koop” which is the Afrikaans word for “buy”.
twie – The Afrikaaps word for “twee” which is the Afrikaans word for “two”.
droeg – The Afrikaaps word for “droog” which is the Afrikaans word for “dry”.
hiesa – The Afrikaaps word for “hierso” which is the Afrikaans word for “over here / right here”.
koellek – The Afrikaaps term for the English word “collect”.
soelang – The Afrikaans word for “solank” which is the Afrikaans word for “meanwhile / in the mean time”.
gel – The Afrikaaps word for “geld” which is the Afrikaans word for “money”.
moerit – The Afrikaaps term for “moet dit” which when translated from English to Afikaans “moet = must” and “dit = it” would then each be placed either side of a verb. “moerit enjoy” = “must enjoy it
virrie – The Afrikaaps word for “vir die” which in Afrikaans means“for the”.
laanie – The Afrikaaps word for “boss” and often used to refer to white people but also as in this case used to refer to someone who appears well-off.
garret – The Afrikaaps word for “gaan dit” which in Afrikaans means“(how) it goes / (how) things are” .
vegiettie – The Afrikaaps word for “vergeet nie” which in Afrikaans means“forget not”.
waate – The Afrikaaps word for “water” which is spelled the same way in both Afrikaans and English.

Each Other’s Language

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“Did you know that in Japan if the trains are running late, which is very seldom, the warders come around and apologise to every commuter for the inconvenience. On top of that, every commuter is issued with a letter confirming that the trains were delayed saving the employee the embarrassment of explaining and apologizing to the employer,” a guy in a neat white shirt and black pants explains to the guy standing next to him who is perusing a page of his newspaper.

Without taking his eyes off the page the man replies: “Well… Die is Africa; who cares.”

“I’m just trying to draw a comparison between the ethics and cultures,” the guy in white defends his statement.

Kan djy nie jou mond hou nie huh? the guy with the newspaper thinks to himself.

“Ek ry al vyf-en-dêtag jaa trein en laat kô is soe oud soesie ark my broe,” he answers.

For a few moments they travel in silence with the mechanical sound of the train almost overwhelming.

The guy in the white shirt curiously peeps into the other one’s newspaper. He looks at the guy holding the paper and enquires: “When is the shooting ever going to stop bru?”

The newspaper guy takes his time to answer while he thinks to himself: “Djy kan nou ophou Engels praat.”

“Waa skiet hulle sien djy?” he asks.

With a surprised look on his face the guy in white shoots back, “There!” and points to the picture in the paper.

“Sien; djy wietie waa nie. Djy kan nie Afrikaans lies ’ie,” the newspaper guy shoots back even faster.

“I can, but I prefer English. It is my home language,” the guy in white explains.

The newspaper guy’s eyes keep browsing the page. “Sien djy ek hou die koeran met twie hanne vas en ek staan op al twie biene? Djy moet al twie tale kan praat om jouself te kan balance,” he responds without looking up; his eyes still buried in the paper.

“I can speak Afrikaans, but my first response is always English. My Afrikaans sounds hectic man,” the guy in white retorts almost as if he is feeling sorry for himself.

“Ek kan Engels praat maa is comfortable in Afrikaans. Ek praat net Engels in self-defence,” the newspaper guy says sheepishly as he looks at the other guy for a second.

Looking baffled the guy in white asks: “What do you mean by self-defence?”
“Net as ek moet Engels praat want die plek is mos loaded met foreigners en wat wiet hulle van Afrikaans?” he explains his somewhat strange motive.

Again they are silent for a few moments.

“So do you think Afrikaans is a dying language?” the guy in white asks after their little interlude.

“Nooitie my pel; ôs praat Afrikaans hie innie land; different tonge vir different regions but Afrikaans praat ôs, soe laat jou kinnes die taal lee. Doen hulle ’n favour; vat my advice,” the newspaper guy explains, this time looking the guy straight in the face.

“My mother is English; my father is Afrikaans. I attended an English school and both of them speak English to me, but my father speaks Afrikaans all the time when he’s angry or upset,” the guy with the white shirt sheds more light on his preference for the English language.

“Vloek jou ma terug in Afrikaans?” the newspaper guy asks, closing the paper in order to turn the page.

“My mother never swears. She only says ‘God help us’ when my father goes crazy in Afrikaans.”

“Sê vir jou pa hy moet next time try om in Engels te skel as hy weer kwaad raak en dan kyk djy hoe hy gaan struggle. Sal djy my broe?” the newspaper guy suggests with a twinkle in his eyes.

A smile appears on the white shirt guy’s face. He thinks for a moment then answers, “Hy gaan sy tong raak byt buddy.”

They both burst out laughing. The newspaper guy gathers himself and adds: “My goeiste goeie genugtig’ gaan jou ma sê.”

The train enters the station and both of them move towards the door.

“Djy moet ’n koerrekte dag het my broe,” the newspaper guy bids his friend farewell.

“Cool man; same to you,” the guy in white replies as they part ways on the platform.

A language barrier isn’t always a stumbling block to peace and harmony.

***

Urban Dictionary
dêtag – The Afrikaaps word for “dertig” which is the Afrikaans word for “thirty”.
jaa – The Afrikaaps word for “jaar” which is the Afrikaans word for “year”.
soesie – The Afrikaaps term for “soos die” which in Afrikaans means “like the”.
wietie – The Afrikaaps term for “weet nie” which in Afrikaans means “do not know”.
koeran – The Afrikaaps word for “koerant” which is the Afrikaans word for “newspaper”.
biene – The Afrikaaps word for “bene” which is the Afrikaans word for “legs”.
nooitie – The Afrikaaps term for “nooit nie” which in Afrikaans means “never”.
kinnes – The Afrikaaps word for “kinders” which is the Afrikaans word for “children”.
vloek – The Afrikaans word for “swear / curse”.
skel – The Afrikaans word for “scold”.
koerrekte – The Afrikaaps word for “korrekte” which is the Afrikaans word for “correct” in this case meaning “fantastic”.

“Kan djy nie jou mond hou nie huh?”
“Can’t you be quiet?”
(Literally translates to ‘Can’t you hold your mouth?’)

“Ek ry al vyf-en-dêtag jaa trein en laat kô is soe oud soesie ark my broe.”
“I have been riding the train for thirty-five years and being late is as old as the ark my brother.”

“Sien; djy wietie waa nie. Djy kan nie Afrikaans lies ’ie.”
“See; you don’t know where. You cannot read Afrikaans.”

“Sien djy ek hou die koeran met twie hanne vas en ek staan op al twie biene? Djy moet al twie tale kan praat om jouself te kan balance.”
“You see I am holding the newspaper with two hands and I am standing on both legs? You must be able to speak both languages to be able to balance yourself.”

“Ek kan Engels praat maa is comfortable in Afrikaans. Ek praat net Engels in self-defence.”
“I am able to speak English but I am comfortable in Afrikaans. I only speak English in self-defence.”

“Net as ek moet Engels praat want die plek is mos loaded met foreigners en wat wiet hulle van Afrikaans?”
“It is only when it is a must that I speak English because this place is loaded with foreigners and what do they know of Afrikaans?”

“Nooitie my pel; ôs praat Afrikaans hie innie land; different tonge vir different regions but Afrikaans praat ôs, soe laat jou kinnes die taal lee. Doen hulle ’n favour; vat my advice.”
“Never my pal; we speak Afrikaans here in this country; different tongues for different regions but it is Afrikaans we speak, so let your children learn the language. Do them a favour; take my advice.”

“Vloek jou ma terug in Afrikaans?”
“Does your mother swear back (at him) in Afrikaans?”

“Sê vir jou pa hy moet next time try om in Engels te skel as hy weer kwaad raak en dan kyk djy hoe hy gaan struggle. Sal djy my broe?”
“Tell your dad that next time he should try to scold in English when he is angry and then you look at how he will struggle. Would you my brother?”

“Hy gaan sy tong raak byt buddy.”
“He will bite his tongue buddy.”

“ ‘My goeiste goeie genugtig’ gaan jou ma sê.”
“ ‘My goodness good gracious’ your mother will say.”

“Djy moet ’n koerrekte dag het my broe.”
“You must have a fantastic day my brother.”

Hidden History

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“The trains are messed up again today,” a guy, not looking a day older than twenty five, says to his friend standing next to him.

The train maintains a constant speed paying no attention to his remark.

“I take it as it comes; no stress,” the friend replies nonchalantly.

The guy scratches in a bag slung over his shoulder, opens his lunch box, and takes out a sandwich. Before he takes a bite he manages to say: “Been up since five this morning and never had a chance to have breakfast. I had to fix the wife’s hairdryer this morning. The dog chewed the chord in half, fortunately it wasn’t plugged in.”

He takes a bite of the sandwich and shakes his head. The friend looks at him and rolls his eyes. Within seconds the sandwich is devoured.

“Elke oggen se ding,” he says while the sandwich makes its way to his stomach.

“My wife got so fed up with struggling with her hair that she eventually had it cut short; almost schoolboy style,” the friend comments.

I wonder… should I have another sandwich? the guy with the sling bag thinks. Rather not, let me wait for teatime, he finally decides.

“I saw that time I met your motjie, that she has Malaysian features,” he suddenly thinks out loud.
The friend looks at him with a grin on his face. “Yes she hails from the Bo-Kaap,” he says casually.

“Bo- Kaap nogal, but waar kry sy daai features, blush complexion oval eyes and dark hair?” the guy with the sling bag explains.

“Djy het oek my motjie gestudy ou bra,” the friend replies seeming almost surprised.

“No, no, not in that way. It was just my observation,” he laughingly explains himself away, waving his hands.

“OK, just checking, but she says her grandfather’s ancestor came to South Africa in the seventeen hundreds as a Malay slave. Her grandfather on the other hand carried an Identity Document which classified him as Cape Malay,” the friend says shrugging shoulders in a manner which suggests: That’s what she says. I can’t argue.

“Wow, cool!” the guy with the sling bag exclaims with a ‘tell-me-more’ look on his face.

“She says that her grandfather told the story that his grandfather was a tailor. His daughter became a dressmaker while her three brothers were master-builders. They were part of a group who designed and built the houses in the ‘Ses’. Those guys were skilful, productive and contributed towards the economy in an area where people of all races lived together in harmony. Everybody was like family during that time; according to the motjie,” the friend further unravels the history of his wife’s foreign features.

The guy with the sling bag thinks for a moment then says: “So the term or title ‘Cape Malay’ is derived from ‘Cape Malaysian’ and doesn’t necessary mean all Cape Muslims?” and waits for his friend’s response.

“As far as I can understand and I’m not an expert on the topic I’m just listening to the motjie’s stories,” the friend explains shrugging his shoulders.

He continues: “She says that Afrikaans, the way we speak it on the Cape Flats, has its roots in the Bo-Kaap. Words like motjie; baadjie; piesang; piering; tramakasie and boeja all come from the Malays.”

“So Afrikaans isn’t the language of white people or die boere?” the guy with the sling bag asks looking even more curious.

“Nooitie! Afrikaans is ôsse taal. Daai is ’n misconception,” the friend explains looking somewhat irritated.

“Wow! Djy sê daai ding bra,” the guy with a sling bag replies while adjusting his baseball cap.

“For example, my surname is November,” he continues. “My father says the name was given to slaves who arrived at the Cape during that month.”

“So all the Novembers could possibly be related,” the friend teases.

The guy pulls the baseball cap over his face looking baffled. “Miskien moet ek it ytcheck,” he manages to say through the cap.

Arriving at Salt River station Table Mountain towers into the clear blue sky with a wealth of history laid at its feet.

***

Urban Dictionary

motjie – An Afrikaaps word for “wife” originating from Malay.

Bo-Kaap – A residential area on the edge of Cape Town’s city centre. Previously occupied exclusively by people classified as Cape Malay.

Ses – The Afrikaans word for “six” in this case specifically referring to District Six in Cape Town.

baadjie – The Afrikaans word for “jacket” originating from Malay.

piesang – The Afrikaans word for “banana” originating from Malay.

piering – The Afrikaans word for “saucer” originating from Malay.

tramakasie – An Afrikaaps word for “thank you” originating from the Malay / Indo-Arabic “terima kasi”.

boeja – An Afrikaaps word originating from Mala/ Indo-Arabic which means loosely means “uncle” and is usually used to endearingly refer to a mature Muslim man.

boere – The Afrikaans word for “farmers” which as in this specific case is also used to refer to White Afrikaners. In Afrikaaps it is also used to refer to police officers irrespective of their race as during the Apartheid years the South African Police was exclusively commanded by White Afrikaner males.

nooitie – The Afrikaaps version of the Afrikaans term “nooit nie” which means “never/not ever”. The word “nooit” on its own also means “never”.

ôsse – The Afrikaaps version of the Afrikaans word “onse” which means “our”.

ytcheck – An Afrikaaps term for “check out” combining the Afrikaaps word “yt” for “uit” meaning “out” and the English word “check”.

“Elke oggen se ding.”
“It’s an every morning thing.”

“Bo- Kaap nogal but waar kry sy daai features?”
“Bo-Kaap mind you, but where does she get those features?”

“Djy het oek my motjie gestudy ou bra.”
“You’ve also studied my wife old buddy.”

“Nooitie! Afrikaans is ôsse taal. Daai is ’n misconception.”
“Never! Afrikaans is our language. That is a misconception.”

“Wow! Djy sê daai ding bra.”
“Wow! That’s what you’re saying buddy.”

“Miskien moet ek it ytcheck.”
“Maybe I must check it out.”

A United Front

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The early morning breeze greets us with a cold hand as it rushes down the platform. A few commuters try to hide, others bravely stand their ground ignoring its attempt to cause discomfort.

A newspaper vendor walks past encouraging potential customers to purchase the daily paper by saying: “Fresh from the press eksê. Good cop love affairs wat flop. Don’t get caught napping on the job. Thank you. Dankie.”

He turns and smiles when he hears: “Hello hiesa,” from a voice behind him.

“Thank you. Dankie,” he says as the newspaper is swiftly exchanged for a silver coin. He continues with his rhyme as he strolls off.

The train appears with a peace sign painted on its face as if to apologise for unexpectedly running on time.

“Die ou mense is geworried oor hulle pension. SASSA wag ees vir ’n court ruling,” a guy says to a friend as we leave the station.

“Ek hoo’ die move,” the friend replies.

He then explains further. “My neighbour het twie laaities op skool. ’n Ou lady van siewentag, Haa’ dogte is dood ennie laaities is by haa’. Hoe gaan sy maak as haai grant nie ytstiek nie?” he asks with a concerned expression.

“Daai is ma een example wat ek van wiet. Daa’s duisende soes daai,” he goes on to say
“Ek wietie ou bra. As ’ie gel nie geroof word ’ie dan, is haa’ ’n problem mettie service provider. Ôs moet ma bid broe,” the friend calmly explains.

“Ek is al blou gebid al. Dit raak net worse man,” the guy says out loud, almost shouting. He pulls up his hoodie as the wind rushes through a broken window.

“Djy moenie pluck veloo’ nie brother. Stay positive and things will change for the better,” the friend encourages him.

The guy with the hoodie looks in silence at his friend for a brief moment.

The friend looks at his cell phone then back at the guy with the hoodie.

“Miesies Jacobs kyk na my laaities na skool. Soe kry sy extra income en ôs gie ha mee as wat sy charge, want die laaities slaap somma daa as ek ennie motjie uitgaan en laat terugkom. Sy’s ’n sweet old lady, maa sy battle to make ends meet. Times are tough.” The guy with the hoodie explains further, shedding more light on the situation.

“Het miesies Jacobs net die een dogte gehet?” the friend asks casually.

“Ja man; haa’ man is voo’ die dogte dood. Dit was net sy ennie dogte ennie twie laaities,” the guy with the hoodie replies.

“Julle is mos nou haa adopted family ou broe. Wiet djy daai?” the friend says looking him straight in the face.

“Of course wiet ek daai. My motjie het haa’ ma jonk veloo’ soe miesies Jacobs is n mother figure vi haa’.”

“Hulle het gebond die moment toe ôs daa intrek,” the guy with the hoodie proudly explains.

The train reduces speed as we enter Mutual station where the bulk of commuters leave the carriage.

A vendor enters and immediately goes on the attack.

“Your one stop mobile refreshment shop; always on time,” he announces his arrival.

He glides down the passage with an eagle eye looking for potential customers giving the slightest indication of reaching for their purses.

“Ek agree met jou dat die ouens in die boenste kantore moet hulle act together kry but ôs communities moet mense soes miesies Jacobs embrace. Ôs is selfish en te self-centered. Ôs willie involved raakie. Daai’s mossie ôs se problem ’ie” the friend tells the guy with the hoodie who in turn listens attentively.

“By the way hoe is haa dogte dood?” he asks.

The guy with the hoodie clears his throat, steadies himself and says: “Baie sad storie. ’n Stray bullet van ’n gang fight while sy in ’n taxi ry. Innocent my broe.”

“Ek blaas somma ’n gasket as ek daaraan dink,” he says looking sad and agitated at the same time.

The friend hides his eyes in his right hand and shakes his head in disbelief.

“Sometimes wish ek ’n lightning bolt wil die no-good jongens doodslat ou bra man,” he continues with his eyes still hidden away in his right hand.

“Djy moet bid broe. Moenie pluck veloo nie,” the guy with the hoodie whispers. His friend glances at him in silence. A smile starts to appear on his face.

“Ôs moet begin saam staan irrespective of colour religion creed or class. Only that way gan ôs die criminals van parlemin tot Parkwood beat. Daai’s hulle biggest fear. Ôs is die majority but die criminals wat die minority is rule vi ôs. Does that make sense?” he asks the guy in the hoodie who shakes his head from side to side indicating ‘no not all’.

“Die bra praat die waarheid. Ôs moet minner depend op politicians. Ôs moet ’ie masses mobilise just like in the old days; a united democratic front,” he quietly thinks to himself.

“But wait…” his thoughts continue. “Lat ek gou die motjie remind miesies Jacobs gaan brood bak en vye jam maak net soes my ou girl back in the day”.

***

Urban Dictionary

ekes – An Afrikaans slang word meaning “I say”

hiesa – The Afrikaaps version of the Afrikaans word “hierso” which means “right here”.

geworried – The Afrikaaps way of saying “worried”.

ees – The Afrikaaps version of the Afrikaans word “eers” which means “first”.

hoo – The Afrikaaps version of the Afrikaans word “hoor” which means “hear”.

twie – The Afrikaaps version of the Afrikaans word “twee” which means “two”.

siewentag – The Afrikaaps version of the Afrikaans word “sewentig” which means “seventy”.

haa (1) – The Afrikaaps version of the Afrikaans word “haar” which means “her”.

haa (2) – The Afrikaaps version of the Afrikaans word “daar” which means “there”.

haai – The Afrikaaps version of the Afrikaans word “daai” which means “that”. (Haai also happens to be the Afrikaans word for shark.)

ytstiek – The Afrikaaps version of the Afrikaans word “uitsteek” which means “to be visible” but in Afrikaaps means to “arrive” or “show up”.

dogte – The Afrikaaps version of the Afrikaans word “dogter” which means “daughter”.

Miesies – The Afrikaaps version of the word “Mrs (missus)”.

laaities – A South African slang word for “children / kids”.

veloo – The Afrikaaps version of the Afrikaans word “verloor” which means “lose”.

motjie – An Afrikaaps word for “wife”.

jongens – An Afrikaaps word for “guys” usually but not always meant to infer that they are “thugs”.

doodslat – The Afrikaaps version of the Afrikaans word “doodslaan” which means “beat to death”.

boenste – The Afrikaaps version of the Afrikaans word “boonste” which means “top / highest / uppermost”.

parlemin – An Afrikaaps way of saiyng“parliament”.

Die ou mense is geworried oor hulle pension. SASSA wag ees vir ’n court ruling.
“The old people are worried about their pension. SASSA is first waiting for court ruling”

Ek hoo’ die move.”
“I hear the move.” (Move meaning the situation/story.)

My neighbour het twie laaities op skool. ’n Ou lady van siewentag, Haa’ dogte is dood ennie laaities is by haa’.”
“My neighbour has two kids on school; an old lady of seventy. Her daughter is dead and the children are with her. ”

Hoe gaan sy maak as haai grant nie ytstiek nie.
“What will she do if that grant does not arrive?”

Daai is ma een example wat ek van wiet. Daa’s duisende soes daai.”
“That is but one example which I know of. There are thousands like that.”

Ek wietie ou bra. As ‘ie gel nie geroof word ‘ie, dan is haa’ ’n problem mettie service provider. Ôs moet ma bid broe.”
“I don’t know old friend. If the money isn’t being robbed, then there is a problem with the service provider. We must just pray brother.”

Ek is al blou gebid al. Dit raak net worse man.”
“I have prayed till I am blue. It only gets worse man.”

Miesies Jacobs kyk na my laaities na skool. Soe kry sy extra income en ôs gie ha mee as wat sy charge, want die laaities slaap somma daa as ek ennie motjie uitgaan en laat terugkom.”
“Mrs Jacobs looks after my kids after school. That way she gets extra income and we give her more than what she charges, because the kids just sleep there if the wife and I go out and come back late.”

Het miesies Jacobs net die een dogte gehet.”
“Did Mrs Jacobs only have the one daughter?”

Ja man; haa’ man is voo’ die dogte dood. Dit was net sy ennie dogte ennie twie laaities.”
“Yes man; her husband passed away before her daughter died. It was just her, the daughter and the children.”

Julle is mos nou haa adopted family ou broe. Wiet djy daai?
“You are after all her adopted family old brother. Do you know that?”

Of course wiet ek daai. My motjie het haa’ ma jonk veloo’ soe miesies Jacobs is ’n mother figure vi haa’.”
“Of course I know that. My wife lost her mother when she was young so Mrs Jacobs was a mother figure for her.”

Hulle het gebond die moment toe ôs daa intrek.
“They bonded the moment we moved in there.”

Ek agree met jou dat die ouens in die boenste kantore moet hulle act together kry but ôs communities moet mense soes miesies Jacobs embrace. Ôs is selfish en te self centered. Ôs willie involved raakie. Daai’s mossie ôs se problem ‘ie.
“I agree with you that the guys in the highest offices must get their act together but our communities must embrace people like Mrs Jacobs. We are selfish and too self-centered. We don’t want to get involved. That is after all not our problem.”

Ek blaas somma ’n gasket as ek daaraan dink.”
“I just about blow a gasket when I think about it.”

Ôs moet begin saam staan irrespective of colour religion creed or class. Only that way gan ôs die criminals van parlemin tot Parkwood beat.
Daai’s hulle biggest fear. Ôs is die majority but die criminals wat die minority is rule vi ôs.”
“We should start standing together irrespective of colour, religion, creed or class. Only that way are we going to beat the criminals from parliament to Parkwood. That is their biggest fear. We are the majority but the criminals who are the minority rule us.”

Die bra praat die waarheid. Ôs moet minner depend op politicians. Ôs moet ‘ie masses mobilise just like in the old days.”
“The brother speakes the truth. We should depend less on politicians. We should mobilise the masses just like in the old days.”

Lat ek gou die motjie remind miesies Jacobs gaan brood bak en vye jam maak net soes my ou girl back in the day.”
“Let me quickly remind the wife that Mrs Jacobs will be baking bread and making fig jam just like my old girl (my mom) back in the day.”